Claiming Compensation For Glass In Your Eye

If you’re looking for personal injury compensation for glass in your eye, this guide could help. Penetrating injuries to the eye can have far-reaching consequences and you may need to seek damages to readjust to life. So in the following sections, we explain the personal injury claims process.

We begin by explaining who is eligible to start a valid eye injury claim like this. After discussing the eligibility criteria, we look at the duty of care that road users, employers, and those responsible for public places must abide by to ensure the safety of others.

We look at some examples of how a breached duty of care could qualify you to seek compensation for glass in the eye. In addition, we explain the evidence that can help support your eye injury claim, as well as the types of compensation that you could be awarded if your claim is a success.

To conclude, we explain the advantages of working with a personal injury solicitor with experience in handling eye injury claims like this. And how you could work with one under a type of No Win No Fee agreement.

If you have any questions as you read this eye injury claims guide, please get in touch with our team of friendly advisors. They can assess the strength of your claim for free and offer guidance on your next step:

  • Call an advisor 24/7 on 0800 408 7825 to get started.
  • Or you can complete the callback form on our website.
  • Also, you can use our live chat to start a conversation about your eye injury compensation claim.

a woman with a bandaged eye after getting glass stuck in it

Browse Our Guide

  1. Claiming Compensation For Glass In Your Eye
  2. What Evidence Is Needed For An Eye Injury Compensation Claim?
  3. How Much Eye Injury Compensation Could You Receive?
  4. Is There A Time Limit When Claiming Compensation For Glass In Your Eye?
  5. Could I Use No Win No Fee Personal injury Solicitors For An Eye Injury Compensation Claim?
  6. Learn More About Making Eye Injury Claims

Claiming Compensation For Glass In Your Eye

Glass in the eye can cause a wide array of long-term health and financial problems. Complete sight loss may prevent a return to work or normal life on any level. Because sight is deemed so precious, the potential eye injury compensation amounts try to reflect this and we explore it in detail below.

But firstly, to have an eligible personal injury claim, you need to demonstrate three points:

  • A duty of care was owed to you.
  • This duty was breached.
  • The breach resulted in you sustaining an injury, either physical, psychological or both.

Together, these three points define negligence in tort law, which is essential to prove in order to move forward with your claim. We now look at the duty of care owed on the roads, in public places and in the workplace:

Road Traffic Accident

Road users need to comply with the Road Traffic Act 1988 and the Highway Code to uphold their care duty of care. It requires them to drive and navigate the roads in a way that prevents injury or damage to themselves and others.

An example of how glass could penetrate the eye on the roads is during a collision with a speeding driver, the windowscreen shatters, causing severe eye injuries. Because of this, head-on car accident, you are left with partial or complete blindness. 

Public Place Accident

Those in control of public places have a duty of care to ensure visitors are reasonably safe when using the premises for their intended purpose. This is outlined by the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957. Failure to carry out risk assessments on premises and respond to hazards could cause an eye injury in several ways.

For example, there is a broken shelf in a supermarket that houses glass bottles. The supermarket owner has failed to have the shelf repaired. As you walk past, the shelf breaks, bottles smash against the floor and shards of glass penetrate your eyes. This causes complete blindness.

Accidents At Work

Employers have a duty of care to take reasonable and practicable steps to ensure employees are safe when working. This duty of care is established by the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (HASAWA).

To fulfil these obligations, employers could ensure risk assessments are carried out regularly, train staff on how to do their job safely and provide personal protective equipment when it is necessary.

For example, if you work on a construction site around people using angle grinders, you could suffer an eye injury if you’re not provided with protection.

With this in mind, an employer could fail to provide personal protective equipment (PPE) such as safety goggles when necessary. As a consequence, an employee has no defence against flying debris (such as glass) which could penetrate one or both eyes, causing very serious eye injuries. This could be valid grounds for a workplace injury claim.

What Evidence Is Needed For An Eye Injury Compensation Claim?

As part of the eye injury claims process, you will be required to gather evidence. Below we have detailed some types of evidence that could help prove eye injury compensation claims.

  • Collect witness contact details – this is so a statement can be gathered at a later date.
  • Take photographic evidence of the injury and the cause.
  • Medical evidence – get copies of medical records and reports from eye specialists.
  • Gather any CCTV or dashcam footage that is available.

As part of the service, a solicitor from our panel offers to claimants making eye injury claims, they will help with the gathering of supporting evidence. They can also arrange for your independent medical assessment so that your injuries can be assessed.

How Much Eye Injury Compensation Could You Receive?

Eye injury compensation is always decided on a case-by-case basis. So how much compensation will be awarded will be unique to the claimant. However, successful personal injury claims can receive a payout made up of two heads of loss. The first one is general damages which aims to compensate you for the suffering and pain you’ve endured and for loss of eminity. The following factors can be considered when general damages are being valued:

  • Long-term medical treatment
  • Cosmetic effect
  • Psychological impact
  • Recovery time.
  • The impact on quality of life.

Public Accident Claims Calculator

Those tasked with calculating general damages can use medical reports to help them. In addition to this, they may refer to documents such as the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG), which lists guideline compensation awards based on type and severity of injury. We’ve included an excerpt from this below. However, the topline entry is not taken from the JCG:

Compensation Table

Edit
Injury Type Severity Award Bracket Notes
Multiple Injuries That Are Very Severe in Nature and Financial Losses Incurred Very Severe Up to £1 million + This reflects very severe multiple injuries plus amounts for care cots,lost earnings and medical needs.
Injuries Affecting Sight (b) Total Blindness In the region of £268,720 Cases where sight has been lost permanently in both eyes.
(c) Loss of Sight in One Eye with Reduced Vision in the Remaining Eye (i) £95,990 to £179,770 Cases of serious risk of further deterioration in the eye that remains.
(c) Loss of Sight in One Eye with Reduced Vision in the Remaining Eye (ii) £63,950 to £105,990 Cases of reduced vision in the remaining eye as well as double vision problems.
(d) Total Loss of One Eye. £54,830 to £65,710 The award will depend on age of person and the level of psychiatric and cosmetic impact.
(e) Complete Loss of Sight in One Eye £49,270 to £54,830 Award takes into account a degree of risk of sympathetic ophthalmia. Also where there is scarring in the region.
(f) Complete Loss of Sight in One Eye £23,680 to £39,340 Serious but incomplete loss of vision in one eye but no significant risk of loss or reduced vision in the remaining eye.
(g) Complete Loss of Sight in One Eye £9,110 to £20,980 Minor (but permanent) vision impairment in one or both eyes as well as double vision and light sensitivity.
(h) Minor Eye Injuries £3,950 to £8,730 Cases where the person is hit in the eye or is exposed to smoke, fumes, chemicals or liquids that cause immediate issues but no long term damage.
(i) Transient Eye Injuries £2,200 to £3,950 The person will have a complete recovery within a few weeks.

How To Claim For Financial Losses

The second head of loss in personal injury cases is special damages which can be included in compensation payouts. This awards eye injury compensation to reimburse any out-of-pocket expenses created by the eye injury. It’s important to keep hold of payslips, receipts and statements that prove these losses. Some examples of costs that you could potentially claim back under special damages include:

  • Past or future loss of income.
  • Medical expenses.
  • Travel costs.
  • The cost of alterations needed at home.
  • Specialist eyewear.

For more guidance on general and special damages in eye injury claims, speak to an advisor at the contact number above.

Is There A Time Limit When Claiming Compensation For Glass In Your Eye?

Under the Limitation Act 1980, there is a three-year time limit to starting eye injury claims. This time frame typically starts from the date of the accident itself.

Some exceptions apply to this. For instance, if someone cannot claim for themselves because of a lack of mental capacity, a litigation friend can be appointed by the courts to claim on their behalf. Also, the time limit is paused. If mental capacity returns, (and no one claimed on their behalf), the time frame starts from that date.

Furthermore, if the injured person is under 18, they need a litigation friend to claim for them. Alternatively, the individual can wait until they’re 18 to claim, and the standard three-year time limit would begin from this date.

To find out if you are still within the limitation period to claim eye injury compensation call our advisors today. Through a free consultation, they can tell you the time limits for eye injury claims.

Time-Limits-For-Public-Liability-Claims

Time Limits For Eye Injury Claims

Could I Use No Win No Fee Personal Injury Solicitors For An Eye Injury Compensation Claim

The personal injury solicitors on our panel can offer eligible claimants their services through a version of the No Win No Fee contract. Typically they can offer a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), meaning you don’t need to settle any upfront or ongoing fees for their services. In addition to this, no fees are required for their services if your eye injury claim fails.

Under the terms of a CFA, a success fee becomes due if the eye injury claim has a positive outcome. This fee is taken as a percentage which is restricted by law, thereby ensuring the claimant always receives the majority of the eye injury compensation.

If you would like to find out if you’re eligible to instruct one of the expert No Win No Fee solicitors for your eye injury claim from our panel, get in touch for a free case check. Or you can enquire about possible compensation for glass in the eye through our online contact form.

No Win No Fee Public Liability Claims

No Win No Fee Claims For Eye Injuries

Contact Us About Your Eye Injury Claim

To find out if you could claim eye injury compensation call us for free today. Eye injury compensation claims can be assessed today for free.

  • Call an advisor 24/7 on 0800 408 7825 to get started.
  • Complete the callback form on our website.
  • Also, you can use our live chat feature to start a conversation about your eye injury compensation claim.

Learn More About Making Eye Injury Claims

In conclusion, thank you for reading this guide on compensation for glass in the eye. We hope it has helped improve your understanding of the claims process. These other guides offer more:

In addition, some external resources:

Call our advisors now for an estimate of how much compensation could be awarded for an eye injury compensation claim.