What Are The Most Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace?

Learn How To Claim For Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace

Throughout this guide, we’ll be discussing common manual handling injuries in the workplace and the criteria for making a personal injury claim following an accident at work

As well as this, we’ll be exploring the duty of care that employers have to their employees and outlining what legislation governs workplace health and safety. The different compensation brackets and reflected injuries are in the table below, these have been taken from a document often used by legal professionals for calculating certain damages. 

If you have any questions, then you can call our team of advisors for a free consultation pertaining to your personal injury claim. In just one call, you can get an understanding of the necessary steps you’ll have to take to make a successful claim. 

Get in touch:

  • Put your details in the ‘contact us’ section of our website
  • Phone 0800 408 7825
  • Talk with one of our advisors using live chat

Browse Our Guide

  1. What Are The Most Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace?
  2. When Are You Able To Claim For A Manual Handling Injury?
  3. Manual Handling – Examples Of Employer Negligence
  4. Potential Compensation From An Accident At Work Claim
  5. Evidence That Could Help You Claim For A Manual Handling Injury
  6. Claim For Common Manual Handling Injuries On A No Win No Fee Basis
  7. More Information About Claiming For Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace

What Are The Most Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace?

If you have suffered common manual handling injuries in the workplace, you might be asking can I claim compensation? But what are common manual handling injuries?

The Health and Safety Executive HSE which is the governing body for workplace health and safety, provides statistics on workplace accidents. 1.8 million workers suffered injuries related to their job in 2021/22, of this, 477,000 workers suffered from a work-related musculoskeletal disorder. 61,713 injuries to employees were reported under the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013. Of these 61,713 injuries, 18% were caused by handling, lifting and carrying.

To find out if you could make a personal injury claim against your employer for common manual handling injuries in the workplace, don’t hesitate to contact us by using the contact information above.

When Are You Able To Claim For A Manual Handling Injury? 

All employers automatically have a duty of care to their employees. This means that they should take reasonably practicable steps to ensure the workplace, environment, equipment, and facilities are safe to be used by an employee. In the case that this duty is breached, resulting in an employee being injured, you may be able to claim. The duty of care along with employer responsibilities are outlined clearly in The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974.

As such, you could be eligible to claim compensation for your accident at work if you can prove that:

  • An employer had a duty of care to you at the time and place of the incident
  • The employer’s actions or inactions breached this duty of care
  • This specific breach of duty caused you to be injured. 

For more information on what makes you eligible to make an accident at work claim and to understand what are your rights after an accident at work? contact us by using the information provided above.

Manual Handling – Examples Of Employer Negligence 

Manual handling tasks generally involve the moving of objects. These can be objects of all sizes and shapes. When an employer tasks you with manual handling jobs, they must ensure you have had the correct training, and also, as well as risk assessing the job, they must ensure they reduce the risk of injury. 

Here are examples of how injuries could be caused through manual handling:

  • You have an existing back injury which your employer is aware of, yet they still ask you to carry out lifting work. This exacerbates your original injury.
  • You are not shown how to correctly load a forklift, and due to overloading, the forklift topples over and causes leg and foot injuries.
  • An employee is carrying an object that is far too heavy to be lifted alone, and they drop it on your foot, causing several fractured metatarsals.

You might also be able to claim if you were injured due to no manual handling training at work.

Is There A Time Limit In Manual Handling Claims?

The standard time limit to begin an accident at work claim is three years from the date of the accident. This is set out clearly in The Limitation Act 1980, however, there are exceptions to this. 

For more information on this, contact our team of advisors. 

Potential Compensation From An Accident At Work Claim 

Following a successful claim, your compensation can consist of two heads of claim. The first of these is general damages, which we’ll discuss in more detail below. 

This head of claim aims to compensate claimants for any pain or suffering they’ve experienced as a result of their injuries. Solicitors can use the Judicial College Guidelines JCG to assign a value to your general damages head of claim. Note that these figures cannot be guaranteed. This is because each claim has to be looked at on a case-by-case basis. 

We have included some of the JCG brackets in the table below, however, please note this is only for guidance.

Injury Guideline Compensation Bracket Notes
Neck Injuries (a) Severe (i) In the region of £148,330 Neck injury often associated with incomplete paraplegia. Person will have little movement left in the neck.
Back Injuries (a) Severe (i) £91,090 to £160,980 Cases involving damage to the spinal cord and nerve roots. There is lasting pain and disability, with a combination of incomplete paralysis and impaired function.
Back Injuries (a) Severe (ii) £74,160 to £88,430 Cases that involve damage to the nerves with an associated loss of sensation.
Arm Injuries (a) Severe £96,160 to £130,930 Injuries that fall short of amputation but leave the person little better off than if the arm had been lost.
Leg Injuries (b) Severe (ii) £54,830 to £87,890 Issues leading to permanent problems with mobility, the person will require mobility aids for the rest of their life.
Shoulder Injuries (a) Severe £19,200 to £48,030 Injuries often associated with neck injuries involving damage to the brachial plexus.
Knee Injuries (b) Moderate (i) £14,840 to £26,190 Dislocation, torn cartilage or meniscus which results in minor instability, or another mild future disability.
Ankle Injuries (c) Moderate £13,740 to £26,590 Fractures and ligamentous tears that give rise to less serious disabilities.
Injuries to the Pelvis and Hips (b) Moderate (ii) £12,590 to £26,590 Cases involving successful hip surgery.
Foot Injuries (g) Modest Up to £13,740 Simple metatarsal fractures, ruptured ligaments, puncture wounds.

Special Damages In Manual Handling At Work Claims 

Special damages is the second head of claim that you could be eligible to receive compensation for following a successful claim. These figures aim to reimburse successful claimants for any financial losses that they may have experienced as a result of their injuries. 

Following a successful claim, you could be eligible to receive compensation for:

  • Cost of care
  • Loss of earnings
  • Travel expenses
  • Medication costs
  • Cost of renovations to a home

You’ll have to provide evidence to support this, which can come in the form of receipts, bank statements, and invoices. 

Evidence That Could Help You Claim For A Manual Handling Injury 

In order to prove that your injury was caused by employer negligence, you’ll have to provide evidence. This can come in the form of:

  • CCTV footage of the accident
  • Keeping a diary of your treatment and symptoms
  • Getting medical care and asking for copies of any records produced
  • Taking photographs of your injury and the accident site
  • Taking contact details of potential witnesses. 

As evidence is key to proving liability and causation, it is vital that you collect as much appropriate evidence as you can. If you are unsure about how to do this by, instructing a solicitor from our panel, they will do this as part of the service they provide.   

Claim For Common Manual Handling Injuries On A No Win No Fee Basis 

To find out if you are eligible to make a personal injury claim after suffering common manual handling injuries in the workplace, call our advisors now for a free case assessment. In just one call, they can tell you if you are eligible to make an accident at work claim. If they find that you have a valid case, they could introduce you to a No Win No Fee solicitor from our panel.

When receiving legal representation with a No Win No Fee solicitor, they may ask you to enter into a Conditional Fee Agreement. You won’t be expected to pay any upfront or ongoing fees for their services. Additionally, if you’re unsuccessful in your claim, you are not required to pay for the services provided by a No Win No Fee solicitor. 

However, success fees are required if your claim is successful when instructing a solicitor under a CFA. This is a legally capped percentage and will be contained in the contract that you sign before the solicitor begins work on your case. This is outlined clearly in The Conditional Fees Agreements Order 2013. 

Get in touch: 

  • Fill out your details in the ‘contact us’ section of our website
  • Phone 0800 408 7825
  • Talk with one of our advisors using live chat

More Information About Claiming For Common Manual Handling Injuries In The Workplace 

For more information about claiming for the most common manual handling injuries in the workplace, take a look at other guides from our website:

Learn more by using the following links:

We hope that this guide to claiming for the most common manual handling injuries in the workplace has been helpful, to learn more on how to claim, use the contact details above.