How To Claim If Injured Due To No Manual Handling Training At Work

Employers owe their employees a duty of care to take reasonable steps to ensure their safety. This means providing training where necessary, issuing personal protective equipment, and risk-assessing the work tasks.

If no manual handling training is given at work when it is needed, the employee could go on to injure themselves. In this article, we will explain why manual handling training in the workplace is so important and how you could be eligible to claim if a lack of training has caused you to sustain an injury.

We will also discuss how manual handling accidents can happen and how often workers are injured due to these accidents. You may be eligible to claim compensation if you are injured due to a manual handling accident. We will discuss how much compensation you could receive should you make a successful claim and how a solicitor from our panel may be of assistance when claiming.

Contact our team of advisors today to find out if you could be eligible to claim. They can provide a free consultation, where you can receive free legal advice and more help. To get in touch:

a man suffering from back pain after receiving no manual handling training at work

Select A Section 

  1. Can I Claim If Injured Due To No Workplace Manual Handling Training?
  2. Is Manual Handling Training A Legal Requirement?
  3. Causes Of Manual Handling Accidents At Work
  4. How Often Are People Injured Due To Manual Handling Accidents At Work?
  5. How Much Compensation Could You Get For A Manual Handling Claim?
  6. Talk To Us If No Manual Handling Training At Work Caused An Injury

Can I Claim If Injured Due To No Workplace Manual Handling Training? 

Workplace manual handling training is training provided by your employer to help keep you from becoming injured at work. It does this by teaching proper techniques for lifting and moving heavy loads manually. This training can also include when and how to use lifting aids such as pallet trucks and trolleys.

Under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (HASAWA), every employer owes their employees a duty of care. This means they must take all reasonably practicable steps to keep you safe and mitigate risks in the workplace, which can include providing manual handling training. If your employer does not fulfill this duty, and this causes you to sustain an injury, this is called negligence.

In order to claim for a workplace injury, you must be able to show that:

  • Your employer owed you a duty of care
  • They failed to fulfill this duty
  • As a result, you have sustained an injury

If you receive no manual handling training at work, this could lead to unsafe lifting practices, which could in turn lead to an injury. Contact our team to find out if you could be eligible to claim compensation.

How Long Do I Have To Claim For A Manual Handling Injury?

When making a personal injury claim for a manual handling injury, you generally will have three years from the date of the incident to start your claim. This time limit is set out in the Limitation Act 1980.

However, for certain parties injured in workplace manual handling accidents, there are exceptions to this time limit. This includes claims made on behalf of:

  • Those who lack the mental capacity to claim for themself. For these injured parties, the time limit is suspended indefinitely. During this time, a court-appointed litigation friend could claim on their behalf. However, should the injured party regain this capacity, they will have three years from that date to start a claim if one has not been made on their behalf.
  • Those who are under the age of 18. The time limit is paused until they turn 18. During this time, a litigation friend could claim on their behalf. However, if a claim has not been made for them, they will have three years from the date of their 18th birthday to start a claim.

If you would like to find out if you are still within the limitation period to start your accident at work claim, contact our advisors.

Is Manual Handling Training A Legal Requirement?

So, is manual handling training a legal requirement?

According to Regulation 4 of the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992. so far as is reasonably practicable, employers should avoid employees undertaking any manual handling operations at work which involve a risk of injury. Where this is not possible, the risk needs to be reduced.

According to this legislation, hazardous manual handling should be avoided as much as reasonably practicable, and a risk assessment should be used to help mitigate the risks of manual handling operations that cannot be avoided.

According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the British workplace health and safety regulator, training should be relevant to the work you are carrying out, and include:

Find out if you could be eligible to claim after a lack of manual handling training caused you to become injured by contacting our team.

Causes Of Manual Handling Accidents At Work  

Manual handling accidents can happen for a number of reasons, including:

  • Inadequate training: Lack of training can mean you do not lift heavy weights with the proper technique. This can lead to a serious back injury, or a hernia injury.
  • No Training Given: If you are given no training at all, then you will not know the required techniques for lifting, carrying, pulling, or pushing when moving objects around. This could lead to many different injuries. For example, if you’re tasked to work on a production line without training, you could lift items incorrectly, causing you harm.
  • Loading or unloading accidents: Loading heavy items onto aids such as pallet trucks or trolleys can result in an injury if you have not received adequate training. For example, without training, you may not know the height or weight limits for stacking boxes, which could lead to heavy items falling from the truck or trolley and hitting you.

Contact our team for more information if you received no manual handling training at work that led to you being harmed.

Can I Claim Compensation If Manual Handling Training Was Inadequate?

As we discussed above, your employer must provide you with sufficient manual handling training if you are required to perform any manual handling tasks as part of your work duties. Additionally, under regulation 13 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, they must take into consideration your capabilities before asking you to handle any object. This is part of their duty of care.

If you are injured because your employer did not provide adequate training, you could be eligible to make a manual handling injury claim. However, you must prove that your injuries were caused by your employer failing to adhere to their duty of care.

Get in touch with our advisors if you were injured due to inadequate manual handling training to see whether you could make a personal injury claim.

How Often Are People Injured Due To Manual Handling Accidents At Work? 

Under The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR), the HSE received 61,713 reports of non-fatal employee injuries from employers in 2021/22. Of this number, 18% of injuries were caused by handling, lifting, or carrying accidents.

There is no way to check when no training caused any of the accidents mentioned above. For more information on claiming accident at work compensation, contact our advisors today.

How Much Compensation Could You Get For A Manual Handling Claim? 

A successful personal injury claimant could receive up to two heads of compensation: general damages, and special damages. General damages offer compensation for the pain and suffering caused by the injury. Often, injury at work solicitors will use the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG) to help them value claims. This text offers guideline awards for a variety of injuries with differing severities.

You can find some examples of these figures below as they relate to general damages, but these brackets should be taken as guidelines only. The compensation you could receive can vary depending on the unique circumstances of your case.

Injury Type JCG Bracket Notes
Severe Back Injury (iii) £38,780 to £69,730 Soft tissue injuries, disc lesions and fractured discs that, despite surgery and other treatment, lead to chronic conditions and lasting pain and disability.
Moderate Back Injury (i) £27,760 to £38,780 Compression/crush fractures to the lumbar vertebrae and traumatic spondylolisthesis causing continuous pain are both examples of injuries that could fall under this bracket.
Moderate Back Injury (ii) £12,510 to £27,760 This bracket contains backache caused by injuries to the ligaments or muscles, soft tissue injuries, and prolapsed discs that result in repeated relapses.
Moderate Knee Injury(b) (i) £14,840 to £26,190 Minor instability, weakness, or wasting due to dislocation or torn cartilage or meniscus injuries.
Moderate Knee Injury (b) (ii) Up to £13,740 Injuries similar to those above, but considered less serious and shorter periods of exacerbation or acceleration of pre-existing injuries.
Moderate Foot Injuries (f) £13,740 to £24,990 Displaced metatarsal fractures that may require future surgery.
Hernia (a) £14,900 to £24,170 Even after repair, there is lasting pain and limitation in physical activities.
Hernia (b) £7,010 to £9,110 Direct inguinal hernia that has a chance of recurrence after repair.
Severe Toe Injuries (c) £13,740 to £21,070 Severe crush injuries that necessitate the amputation of or just falling short of amputation in 1-2 toes.
Serious Toe Injuries (d) £9,600 to £13,740 Serious crush injuries and multiple fractures to two or more toes.

Special damages offer compensation for the financial impacts of your injuries. For example, if a manual handling accident leaves you with a work-related back injury such as a herniated disc, you may need a wheelchair to get around. Special damages could potentially cover the cost of the wheelchair and any adjustments that need to be made to your home. Or, if you cannot work due to your injuries, you may be able to claim for a loss of earnings under special damages.

Talk To Us If No Manual Handling Training At Work Caused An Injury 

You may be interested in starting a claim if you have been injured due to no manual handling training at work. In this case, a solicitor from our panel may be able to help. With a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), a type of No Win No Fee arrangement, you can get legal representation, typically without paying any upfront fees. Similarly, your solicitor won’t ask for any ongoing payments as they work on your claim.

If your claim succeeds, your solicitor will take a success fee. This percentage of your compensation award is legislatively capped to ensure you get the majority of your settlement. But, if your claim fails, your solicitor does not take this fee.

Contact our team today to find out if you could be eligible for representation under a No Win No Fee arrangement. After a free consultation, they may put you in contact with a solicitor from our panel. For more information:

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Get in touch with our team today if you were injured because you received no manual handling training at work.